Our culture has a problem with bereavement and we’re expected to get over it as soon as possible. You are expected to consider other people’s feelings – because they often don’t know what to say to you beyond the traditional condolences.

The tendency for doctors to dole out anti-depressants if your grief persists more than several weeks is a symptom of the medicalisation of what is the most natural reaction in the world. ?It is perfectly normal?to feel devastated at the loss of a beloved sibling, spouse or child.

Prescribing anti-depressants which may numb the intensity of your emotional reactions may also numb any positive emotions, so that many people on medication complain that they no longer feel like themselves. They don’t feel engaged, or care enough about anything any more. Taking pills leaches grief of meaning.

Clearing any traumatic responses involves getting in touch with your felt sense of loss and sorrow, allowing?your body to finish processing grief – moving between the intense emotions of bereavement and a sense of calm and growing resilience.